Category Archives: Disability Related Links

Mr Alan Kempster, How Cool are you…….

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Mr Alan Kempster…………….How Cool Are You !!!

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How Much Respect Does This Kid Deserve………………

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Great Site for Disabled Accessories

Disabled & Handicapped Riders

Handicap motorcycles for disabled riders Parts, Products & Modification Special Orders Remember to buy from Freebird Custom Trikes & Motorcycles, the authorized dealer, it helps support the the little guy AND if you contact us, FOR EVEN GREATER DISCOUNTS THAN FACTORY DIRECT, GUARANTEED! Call us for a quote at 573-552-0090 or email us at info@freebirdcustommotorcycles.com THANK YOU!!

Stunning, How Happy Must he be…………………..

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Freedom…………

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The Jade Garden… Thailand’s Only ‘Fully Inclusive’ Disabled Persons Resort…

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Looking for the absolute best in Disabled Holidays?

Then look no further, because here atThe Jade Garden Resort all the stress and headaches involved when searching for the perfect dream location have been totally removed.

How?

Well let us begin!   Here at The Jade Garden we understand that finding a top quality resort specifically designed for disabled persons only, as well as being well able to cater to clients with low to high levels of disability, is these days, almost impossible!

With this in mind we’ve gone ahead and pulled out all the stops to create the most beautifully designed environment possible. And yes, the whole resort is completely disabled friendly, but designed in such a way as to disguise the necessary functional aspects of disability, leaving the resorts overall appearance that of a true tropical paradise.

Check out the Jade Garden full website at http://www.disabled-holidays.org/

Go on mate, you know you can do it……………………………

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Helping Disabled Veteran

Support grows for Weymouth shop helping disabled veteran

Several local merchants and residents have come forward to help a Weymouth auto-repair shop build a customized motorcycle for a partially paralyzed military veteran.

Employees at Factory Collision & Restoration, located on Route 53 in East Weymouth, expect to finish converting a Harley Davidson motorcycle into a specialized rider for James Crosby, 28, by the end of next week. Crosby, of Winthrop, is a retired Marine who was left paralyzed from the waist down after he was injured in a rocket attack in Iraq in 2004.

The bike’s restoration and conversion will come at no cost to Crosby. During the past two weeks, the shop’s owners, Rob DelGallo and his son, Tony, and some of co-workers have devoted hours after work to customizing Crosby’s motorcycle.

Tony DelGallo said his business has received numerous donations since The Patriot Ledger published a report about their work last Thursday. Donations of products or services have come from Advanced Finishing in East Weymouth, Park Avenue Market-Ace Hardware in South Weymouth, Frankenstein Trikes in Fairhaven and Mayo Designs in Weymouth. PPG, a paint manufacturer, is donating more than $2,000 in supplies, DelGallo said.

Also, DelGallo said two residents have donated $300 .

DelGallo said his shop’s Facebook page has attracted a flurry of new “likes” in recent days, and the shop has had more walk-ins than usual this week.

“I wasn’t going into this for any praise, but getting some is pretty nice,” DelGallo said. “My wife is pretty proud of me, so I like that, too.”

DelGallo’s wife is nine months pregnant, so he expects to be a father any day now.

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Left Side Story

Double Amputee Motorcyclist Still Racing Motorcycles.

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We all like to complain about being sore or injured when riding motorcycles.

Well l have just discovered this really cool Aussie bloke, meet Alan Kempster.

Alan was out for a riding one day when a truck driven by a drunk driver hit him on his motorcycle.  Alan lost his right arm and leg in the accident.  Most people would have give up extreme sports or sports all together.  Alan instead of feeling sorry for himself decided to take up water skiing.

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Alan then decided he wants to return to motorcycles and ride again.  Alan rigged up a Left Hand throttle, brake, and clutch configuration.   He racing now in Formula 400 with race number is 1/2 fitting to his situation.

Alan Kempster is a truly inspirational person by returning to motorcycles and what most people would say is impossible.  Well we take our hat off to Alan and his determiniation.

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Ryan Szielenski out Playing at Wheelies, A genuine Onehanded Biker

 

 

 

Chuck Dickerson, Two Artificial Hand and his Triumph Chop………………………..

Meet Chuck Dickerson and his beautiful 68 triumph chop. He is a disabled rider with artificial arms who has been riding like this for 20 years.

Now that takes some mental stamina.. best of luck to him…….

Kenguru Car for Wheelchair Users

Design, power, speed, efficiency, and emissions are often a focal point of the development of a car. However, what about the ease and convenience for drivers who use wheelchairs?

The challenge was answered by Kenguru, an electric car developed by Community Cars and Rehab, Ltd.. These cars use rear-wheel drive system drive (RWD) with two powerful 2 kW electric motor capable of pushing the vehicle up to a maximum speed of 45 km / h.

Mileage of the car weighs 550 kg are in the range 70 to 110 km with the process of charging the battery for 8 hours.

Kenguru is the first  electrically powered car which designed particularly for wheelchair users. Development of technology makes our lives easier. This car is what we all have been wating for. By using this car wheelchair users can get about town without assistance.

Features:
  • Environmentally friendly – completely GREEN car delivering long awaited mobility solution for wheelchair users
  • Driven directly from a wheelchair – access is via the rear-opening tailgate and steering is by motorbike style handlebar  (joystick option will be available in time)
  • Your own wheelchair is secured within the car by an interlocking device
  • The current design allows parking rear end to the pavement for easy access and it is an ideal solution to drivers who only undertake journeys to local shops and services
  • Because of its weight the Kenguru is classified as a scooter and therefore only a scooter driver’s licence is required to drive Kenguru
Kenguru cabin does not have a seat, but room for one driver in a wheelchair. Unlike the cars in general are using the steering wheel and pedals, steering tools like bajaj Kenguru to support the driver with leg muscle dysfunction. Zoern Stacy, CEO of Community Cars, said that they are developing steering joystick.
Initially, Kenguru electric car developed in Hungary and to stagnate due to the economic crisis. Fortunately, a special car with a driver’s wheelchair caught the attention of Stacy and within two years, the production model Kenguru becomes a reality. This car sold for USD25.000.

These Guy’s are Cool………………

 Isaac Elloitt, a very talented young local rider had a pretty big crash,the full extent of his injuries was two broken shoulders, broken leg, broken back, ruptured spleen and punctured lung. His back was plated to hold everything in place until his shoulders had healed and then they were going to work on his spine and getting him to walk again.
The sad part is that it is confirmed that he will never walk again and that he is a paraplegic for life confined to a wheelchair but despite this he has stayed positive and has modified a bike with a small bucket seat and crash bars to protect his legs if he lays it down and has actually passes the MA license and testing requirements (including laps of the track) for him to return to racing after the injuries.

A short video about Darius Glover a 17 yr. old paraplegic who doesn’t let anything stand in his way. Watch and Learn.

The “Mid-Atlantic Fallen Riders Foundation” (FRF) was established during the 2005 season in order to connect the overwhelming support and outreach of the off-road motorcycle community with riders and their families that have sustained serious injuries.

The Bike Experience………….http://www.tbex.co.uk

I really can’t believe that I have never come across this website or have not even heard of them, however now that I have would like to share what they are about. If you are in the UK and want to ride again, these are the boys to go and see. Check them out…………………….

About The Bike Experience

The Bike Experience is a charity which helps motorcyclists who have been paralysed or otherwise disabled experience the thrill of getting back on a bike again in a controlled and safe environment.

Talan Skeels-Piggins, founder of The Bike ExperienceIt is the brainchild of Talan Skeels-Piggins, a self-confessed adventure addict, who found himself paralysed from the mid chest down after a motorcycle accident in 2003.

Talan thought it was impossible to ride again, but then a ‘light bulb’ moment meant he thought he would give it a go.

But you can’t keep a good man down and in July 2009 Talan finally got back on a bike, a Suzuki GSXR1000K6 adapted, thanks to the work of several different people.

Now Talan, who also inspires others as a motivational speaker, wants to share his knowledge with others who want to get back in the saddle and he has bought and adapted a fleet of bikes to do just that.
Talan, Russ, Graham and the Launch Crew run regular track sessions, showing other paralysed/injured bikers that they can still enjoy the thrill of riding two wheels.

With the co-operation of Castle Combe Circuit, a safe and steady route back into biking has been developed.

And with the help of The Big Lottery Fund the Bike Experience is going from strength to strength.

Talan says: ““I never thought after my accident i would ever feel the adrenaline rush of being able to ride again, but The Bike Experience definitely proved me wrong!”

And in the words of Dan Edwards, a Bike Experience rider who took part in June 2011:

“After getting back to the pit lane, reaching a whopping 113 mph on my last lap, I had a grin ear to ear under that helmet of mine, which stayed there for days after.”

How to Ride a Motorcycle With Parts Missing (on you, not the bike) Adaptive Modifications for Amputee Motorcycling

Four wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul.
– Anonymous

Kliktronic shifter close upYou’ve seen them cruising down a winding highway, heard the roar of pipes on the boulevard, dreamed of the thrill and freedom of a motorcycle, and wondered; “Can I still ride a motorcycle after my amputation?”

The answer is an enthusiastic “Yes!” In this article, we will review common motorcycle modifications that can help an amputee rider get back on the road and, just as importantly, how to prepare yourself.

Getting Started

Getting your motorcycle ready for amputee riding isn’t necessarily difficult. You merely need to understand how the controls on the motorcycle operate and how to modify them to work with your prosthesis.

An adaptive rider’s best friend is a local cycle shop with a craftsman who is able to modify your motorcycle, because there are no formal adaptive motorcycling organizations in the U.S. The market is simply too small to find most motorcycle adaptations “off the shelf,” so you may need to customize your bike for your specific needs and abilities. Let’s start by looking at how a rider uses the controls on a motorcycle and some common modifications for amputees.

Left Leg

On a standard motorcycle, the left foot operates the gear shifter by lifting up and pushing down with the toes. Riders with a below-knee (BK) prosthesis can modify the shift lever by adding a heel extension to allow changing gears by both pushing down with the heel and pushing down at the toe position. This system already comes standard on some cruiser models like the Harley-Davidson. Alternatively, the shifter can be moved to the right side, as it used to be on older British bikes. A slick, newer option is the Kliktronic electronic shifter system. The Kliktronic is a gear changer that uses a push-button gear selector on the handlebar, connected to an electric solenoid to operate the bike’s shift lever. Gear changing is done with the left hand, and the entire kit can be moved if you change bikes.

Modifications to the shift lever on Cain's bike.Right Leg

Most motorcycles operate the real wheel brake with a toe lever on the right side. Modification options for right leg amputees include either operating a modified right brake pedal with the prosthesis, moving the brake to the left side, or mounting a second hand brake lever in tandem with the front brake lever on the handlebar. BMW and many other modern motorcycles now come with an anti-lock brake system that automatically interconnects the front and rear brakes and eliminates the need for these changes.

Above-Knee Considerations

Above-knee (AK) riders have two challenges to cope with: keeping the bike upright while stopped, and operating the side stand. Solutions for these challenges include choosing a prosthetic knee that is stable in an extended position and linking the side stand to a hand lever extender below the tank. Many AK riders eliminate these issues by riding a motorcycle with a sidecar or a trike, both of which are more stable yet allow the freedom of motorcycling.

Related ResourcesAmerican Motorcycle Association
www.ama-cycle.orgAmpsCanRide
www.mtb-amputee.com

Disabled Riders of America
http://www.dra.thewyz.com

Mert Lawwill
www.mertlawwill.com/merthome.html

Motorcycle Safety Foundation
www.msf-usa.org

National Association of Bikers with Disabilities (British)
www.nabd.org.uk

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: Motorcycle Safety
www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/ pedbimot/motorcycle/motosafety.html

Other Options for Leg Amputees

Will Craig rides a mountain bike and motorcycles with terminal mods to his arm prosthesis.An alternative to the expense and hassle of modifying a standard motorcycle is to choose one with automatic transmission, where all the bike’s functions are operated by hand controls. Great options vary from the classic Italian Vespa scooter, the “super scooter” Honda Silver Wing and Suzuki 650 Burgman models that have the look and performance of modern motorcycles, to the Ridley cruiser, which has the sound and appearance of a custom V-twin.

Arm Amputees

Arm amputees, even more than leg amputees, are faced with the choice of modifying either the motorcycle or their prosthesis. Changing the motorcycle involves rerouting the standard brake, throttle or clutch controls so they can be operated with one hand. Customized prosthetic modifications allow the rider to engage the brake or clutch with a specialized terminal device designed specifically for the motorcycle. Bike kits and prosthetic solutions are available on the Internet (see Related Resources). Additional recommendations for arm amputees include a front steering dampener and using Velcro® on the glove of the prosthetic hand to assist with controlling the bike and keeping the prosthetic hand on the bars.

Jeff Cain and his classic W650Getting on the Road

Riding a motorcycle is a thoroughly exhilarating and fun experience. But, along with the thrills come some additional risks and responsibilities. Before starting adaptive motorcycling, consider a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) class to learn the rules of the road, and check with your state motor vehicle department to find out if there are additional testing/driving requirements for adaptive riders. Buy the best helmet that is comfortable for you to wear, and wear it every time you ride. Start on side roads away from traffic, and move up to higher speeds and traffic as your skills progress.

See you on the road, and keep the shiny side up!

About the Author

Jeffrey Cain, MD, a bilateral BK amputee, is the chief of family medicine at The Children’s Hospital in Denver, Colorado. Cain is a member of the Amputee Coalition Board of Directors. In his spare time, Cain is a pilot and enjoys swimming, biking, snow skiing and water skiing. He rides a Vespa scooter for urban commuting.

Look Mum, no Hands, Anything is Possible………………..

Bionic Arms………………………………

Onehanded Bike Lifter, Very Useful

Chiang Rai Saddlebags - StanditChiang Rai Saddlebags is currently looking for Thailand dealers for the One Armed Standit motorcycle maintenance stand. This is a good seller and receives high praise from users. Good markup / profit is available for the seller. They offer these items through there retail outlet at 1,000 baht each. For interested dealers, they offer two tier pricing, based on quantity order. Order from 5 to 9 stands and receive a substantial discount. Order 10 or more and receive a deeper discount. Same day shipping is available. Start stocking these today and let them contribute to your bottom line. These stands have been an important player in our yearly sales figures and we think they will be for you as well. We use the following paragraphs in our retail ads and you are welcome to copy them and let the descriptions work for you. We would love to remove the “sold in the far north of Thailand exclusively by Chiang Rai Saddlebags” wording from these ads and see them marketed throughout the country. Contact us today to get started.Welcome to the One Armed Standit, sold in the far north of Thailand exclusively by Chiang Rai Saddlebags. This device is made from polished stainless steel. Every biker should have one in his saddlebag, tank bag or tail bag. The simple design allows the biker to raise the rear wheel of the motorcycle and keep it raised, while performing chain maintenance and lubrication, tire changes or repairs and axle/chain adjustments. The One Armed Standit was marketed to us as the perfect tool for maintaining the rear of the Versys motorcycle and that it is. But it works equally well on a Honda Dream, a Phantom and most other motorcycles. Simply apply the front brake and wrap the Velcro strap around the front brake grip and the accelerator hand grip. This locks the front wheel and stops the bike from rolling as you lift the bike. With the kickstand down, lean the bike over further onto the kickstand and watch as the rear tire clears the ground. Slide the height adjustable stand under the frame on the right side of the bike and lower the bike onto the One Armed Standit. You’re done!! The rear tire and wheel are free to turn, the chain can be rolled forwards or backwards for ease of inspection and lubing and the axle can be adjusted to tighten the chain or to make the real wheel run true.

The telescoping inner rod can be set free with the pull of a pin and then slid in or out to the perfect height for your model of motorcycle and re-pinned in pre-drilled holes. The stainless steel barrel is more than strong enough to hold your motorcycle and will give years of service without wearing out. The device is lightweight, takes up almost no room in your bags and sooner or later, will be the device that saves the day on one of your trips. Don’t get caught out there without it. It is the best portable motorcycle maintenance purchase you will ever make. SPECIAL! With individual one Armed Standit purchases, we supply one free 200ml can of Veloil Motorcycle Chain Lube. Lubing or cleaning your chain before or after each long run will never be easier.

Contact Chiang Rai Saddlebag

Swag’s Rant Chopper Website

I Am now follow a great WordPress Blog, Swag’s blog contains some great Chop’s and is being followed by some really cool like-minded people.  He is a man after my own heart building low budget chop using swap meet junk. Check him out…

http://bikerswag.wordpress.com/